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In The BNOTP Library: Coming Home

For as long as I can remember, I’ve said to anyone who would listen, I’d love to live in an old house one day. I love the architecture and sometimes quirky personalities of older homes. I especially love their anything-but-cookie-cutter design.

One friend used to always say to me, “Don’t buy an old home, build one!” She would remind me if I built a new-old house, I could get all the features I wanted and loved in historic homes without the negatives that sometimes come with owning one, like major expenses in restoration and upkeep.

The book I’m sharing today is one I had on my Amazon “wish list” for over a year before I finally took the plunge and purchased it last summer.  It’s written by James Lowell Strickland, the President and senior partner of Historical Concepts, an Atlanta Architecture and Design firm. This book beautifully showcases the concept of building a new-old house, heavy in all the features so often loved in old southern homes.

Be sure and check out some of Historical Concept’s previous design work at their website HERE and HERE.  You’ll immediately recognize many of them, including the two Southern Living Idea houses that were in Senoia, Georgia a few years back. I was blown away by all the beautiful designs they’ve created and projects on which they’ve worked. Such an impressive portfolio!

BNOTP Library Logo for Posts

 

In the BNOTP Library: Coming Home: The Southern Vernacular House
Author: James Lowell Strickland
Hardcover: 224 pages
Book Size: 11.3 x 8.9 x 1 inches

Coming Home by James Lowell Strickland

 

3 Things I Like About This Book:

  • Beautiful designs capturing all the things we love about old homes and traditional architecture, yet designed for the way we live today.
  • Nice variety of homes throughout, including mountain retreats, country houses and coastal cottages.
  • The homes feel like real homes where real people live. So many of the homes have a quiet elegance about them, nothing over-done, just warm, inviting spaces that feel like home.

You can read more about this book, Coming Home: The Southern Vernacular House at Amazon where I normally buy my books, via the picture link below.

 

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You’ll find previously featured books from the BNTOP library here: In The BNOTP Library or just click on the collage below.

In the BNOTP Library

 




Comments

  1. bobbi duncan says:

    A new, but old looking cottage home is our dream. I have so many ideas to incorporate–wouldn’t that be such fun? All the nooks and crannies, window seats and bays (lots of windows to bring the outside in), a lovely wide front porch to watch the world go by and a stone or brick patio for lots of bar-be-ques, a white picket fence with rose arbor–oh, I can see it all so clearly, and it’s such a nice daydream. Maybe it will come true one day.

  2. pam ~ crumpety cottage says:

    Susan, I love the idea of a ‘new, old home.’ Lol. I too love the old homes and living in the south, I’m particularly fascinated by the old Antebellum homes. But, it could be an absolute nightmare dealing with re-wiring and re-fitting old pipes. I’ve often thought, why can’t builders include the elements that people love from the old homes, like the mouldings, wainscotting, linenfold paneling, floor to ceiling french windows, nooks and crannies, window seats, etc. The truth is, they could do that, but a lot don’t (probably due to costs.) So having a new home with up to date fixtures, wiring, insulation, etc. would be ideal. I’m going to check this book out. Thanks.

    • I think builders are starting to do more of that now…at least they are in the Atlanta area. It’s funny how we have to lose things to realize how much we like them and wish we still had them.

  3. Nan, Odessa, DE says:

    Susan: This is housekeeping!
    What is the name of dinnerware you used last Christmas? I couldn’t find it to buy last year and want to begin my search now for the coming season.
    Thanks!

    • Nan, are you thinking about the dinnerware that came in so many patterns and was such a great price from Walmart. You can see one of the tables here…is this the dishware you’re thinking of? http://betweennapsontheporch.net/christmas-table-setting-tablescape/
      I ended up making, I think, 4 table settings with it using all the different salad plate designs so I’m guessing that’s the one you’re thinking of. If so, it’s from Better Homes and Garden and on the back of the plates it said, “Better Homes and Garden, Heritage Collection.” It was such a big seller for Walmart, hopefully they will have it again this year.

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